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Fall Vegetable Garden

raised garden bedsThese raised beds don't look very impressive right now but this is a picture of part of my fall vegetable garden. Shortly before Tropical Storm Hanna pelted New Jersey with about three inches of rain, I got out to the garden and planted some seeds.

Since I probably should have done this about 4 weeks ago, I tried to stick to things that would germinate and grow pretty quickly. I planted mostly salad greeny types of things like a Mescalin Mix, some Simpson Lettuce, Radicchio, Arugula and Swiss Chard. Then I figured why not try some other stuff. If it doesn't work, I'm only out some seeds. So I also planted some carrots, beets and bok choy. It might be too late for them but if good weather lasts until October like it did last year, they should be okay.

The goal is to have the fall vegetable garden become the winter vegetable garden. Ever since reading, Four-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long I've wanted to try to grow something through the winter.

First I'll try using some of this Garden Fabric to build some mini hoop houses over my raised beds. Most salad greens can survive cold weather as long as they are protected from the wind. In the worst case scenario, I think I should be able to have a fresh salad for Thanksgiving dinner.

Then if I have some success with the hoop houses, maybe I'll build some cold frames. We'll see how it goes.

But thanks to Tropical Storm Hanna, my Fall Vegetable Garden seeds have been watered nicely and should germinate in another week or so. Thanks Hanna.

6 Comments:

  1. Norie said...
    Hi Anthony,
    I live in the same area and am waiting to receive organic seeds for lettuce, carrots and spinach that I ordered over the weekend. Glad to know I’m not the only late starter for the fall/winter harvest here in northern jersey. I have never grown anything in the fall, so I look forward to reading your update on your fall vegetable garden. I am also thinking of trying winter sewing flower seeds this winter.
    Anthony said...
    Hi Norie,
    Yes, please come back and visit to let me know how your fall garden is doing. It'll be nice to compare notes with someone local.
    Leora said...
    I've tried vegetable gardening in the fall, but not a lot, because my attempts haven't been great. I remember the year my peas grew until the frost came too quickly. I suppose quick growing lettuce might be good. I have some dill that I planted mid-summer, so that might be "pickable" in a few weeks (they are short stubbly things now). And my favorite was the year I planted carrots, forgot I planted them, and then found some stubbly things in the spring. Not too tasty.

    (I also live in New Jersey).
    Daisy said...
    I'm curious; how cold is cold? Below freezing? Below zero at times? Or simply in the 30 to 40 degree range? I'll look into this book and philosophy if it would work in my zone, but I have my doubts.
    Anthony said...
    Hi Leora,
    Quick growing lettuce and other salad greens are a great idea. Although, once the cooler weather comes, I'm going to cover them with garden fabric. Then if I want to keep them going in the winter, a cold frame will be necessary.

    Hi Daisy,
    The example that he uses in the book is that the Northern most point of the USA is Maine, which is the same longitude as the South of France. So sun wise, you should be fine. You would just have to get a cold frame to cover your crops sooner. It's a good book but I've never tried this before. But I enjoy experimenting so why not?
    JGH said...
    Nice beds! I'm putting in some new beds, and haven't gotten to the "raised" part yet. Maybe I'll put some salad seeds in and see what happens, too.

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