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Poblano Pepper Update

Qdoba had better watch out. My homemade poblano pesto is on it's way!

The poblano pepper plants that I started from seed are doing well. They're about 2 feet tall at this point and I'm very happy to report that they are starting to flower. Seems a little early for peppers to be doing anything but I'm not complaining.

All of my peppers plants like to fall over. I don't know if anyone else has this problem but I always have to stake my peppers to keep them off of the ground. A small 3 foot stake is usually plenty.

14 Comments:

  1. Tracy said...
    Anthony: My peppers tend to fall over when they reach about 18" tall, so I stake mine, too. I use 3' dowels I bought at the hardware store, and these work perfectly. My poblanos have flower buds, so I'm probably just a week behind you!
    Ted said...
    Great post. My pepper has several flower buds, but none of them have opened. Considering that you're considerably south of me, I'm hoping that mine should start to flower within a week or two. Having never grown peppers before, I was about ready to write them off.
    Anthony said...
    Tracy, 18" is about where my peppers topple also. But, as we both have discovered, a 3 foot stick is perfect for keeping them standing.

    How to eat your poblanos? Do you smoke them and make anchos like I'm hoping to or do you have other uses/recipes?

    Ted, most peppers need a long hot growing season and I usually see my best peppers very late August or early September. Don't give up on them, they'll surprise you later in the season.
    steven said...
    I never had a problem with my peppers needing stakes in Florida or California, but since I moved to Pennsylvania I've had to stake. Short growing season maybe?
    Carol said...
    So far, I have not had to stake my pepper plants, even though last year they got to 3 feet.

    This year, I'm already getting peppers, including a couple of poblanos, but it does seem early and I don't like the way my pepper plants look. They seem a bit puny, and are dropping their lower leaves. Might be the lack of rainfall. They are probably producing fruit like mad to perpetuate themselves before the keel over!

    Carol at May Dreams Gardens
    Adekun said...
    The peppers here (p-man) have had too much rain, but coping. I usually stake or tie them to a line as they can get top heavy and break.
    Anthony said...
    Steven, that's very interesting. Good theory about the growing season.

    Adekun, using a line is good idea. I hadn't considered that.
    Mariwood said...
    We're not growing poblanos, but we have cayenne and jalapeno peppers. We started them from seed in March. We had to stake one, but not the rest. I think we got our first flowers in early June and the peppers came a few days later. Both types are loaded with peppers now. Could there be that much of a difference between pepper types or between New Jersey and Maryland? Did you buy them as seedlings later in the season? Our sweet peppers that we bought about a month ago as seedlings are WAY behind the hot peppers. I hope they have enough time to give good yield. Any thoughts on the differences in flower timing?
    Anthony said...
    Hi Mariwood,
    I'm growing poblano, jalapeno, CA Wonder (bell) and Corno di Toro and they were all started from seeds. I've had to stake about 40% of the 18 plants that I have but they all have peppers on them now.

    Since I'm not growing any hot peppers (the jalapeno's don't count) this year, I can't compare hot to sweet. Although last year my habaneros and thai dragons took a lot longer than the sweet peppers. It's odd that your sweets are lagging behind.
    Anonymous said...
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    Jim said...
    I live in the Sacramento Valley and have several Poplano plants that appear to be doing very well. I too had to stake them and they are blossoming well. But, so far they have dropped all the blossoms, stem and all. Poor nutrition?
    ronH said...
    I purchased and planted Poblano peppers in June 2008 (my fist time experimenting with peppers). By early August I had several 3-inch peppers, and some smaller. The first pepper we tasted was somewhat hot, but by mid August the 3 we tasted were mild (no heat). Can anyone explain the lack of heat?
    Anthony said...
    Hi Ronh,
    Sure I can explain the lack of heat, Poplano Peppers aren't hot. I think they're ranked sbout the same as a bell pepper as far as heat goes.
    Barbara said...
    This is our first year growing poblano peppers and they seem to be doing pretty well. We already have several peppers. Our question is that they look great in the morning but after they heat of the day (100 degrees or more) they are extremely wilted even though they have plenty of water. Is this normal?

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