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What's Decomposing - Egg Shells

Here's a lonely egg shell sitting on the top of my compost pile. It looks like it has some coffee grinds sprinkled on it but that makes sense because my kitchen compost crock is usually full of coffee grinds (with the filters) and egg shells.

Weekend breakfast in my family of four is great for the compost bin. During the week it's we'll eat cereal or toast or something quick. But on the weekends we like to sit down and eat a hearty breakfast together. And hearty is good for creating compostables.

My wife and I will have two cups of coffee and that means 4 coffee filters full of coffee grinds. 4 filters you say? Yes, we don't use a regular coffee pot anymore. We find it easier to make each cup individually with a Melitta Cone Coffee Maker This way the second cup is as fresh as the first, even if you have it a few hours later.

And then we'll have 2 eggs each. So that's 8 egg shells in one sitting. And since I eat like piggie, let's just say that I have a few more than my share of two. Egg shells are loaded with great stuff that's good for plants. I know of lot of people who crush the shells and put them directly in their garden.

But that's more work than necessary, so I just like to toss mine in the compost bin as you can see.

12 Comments:

  1. Ki said...
    I heard on "You bet your garden" radio show that most soils are calcium deficient so you should keep all your egg shells to place in the garden. So I did.

    I placed them first around a tree the paperbark maple I have had such bad luck in growing...lost 4 previously and I noticed to my delight that the eggshells were being nicely incorporated into the soil. I was looking out the back door one day at the maple and noticed a bird flitting around the base of it. After a little while it picked up a piece of eggshell and flew off. The birds were taking the shells to eat! I guess they are calcium deficient too!

    Well, at least the tree seems to have made it ok despite the lack of eggshells.
    Anthony said...
    Ki, that's part of the reason why I just toss them in the compost bin. This way the calcium goes into my compost and not into a bird's belly. :)
    Opal: Vegan Momma said...
    It's always nice to meet other composters. How do you eat your eggs? Boiled, scrambled, poached? My parents are fans of scrambled eggs.
    Crafty Gardener said...
    I let my egg shells dry out on the counter first. When they are dry they crush up very easily and I add that right into the compost.
    Anthony said...
    opal, the kids like eggs in a hole, my wife likes poached and I usually make a garbage omlet and add all kinds of veggies, leftovers, etc. Good thing I was a short order cook during high school.

    Crafty, I just put my shells into my kitchen compost crock and eventually they make it out to my compost bin. No washing, drying, crushing or any extra work necessary. If a bird snags one then good for him. :)
    Ottawa Gardener said...
    I think crushing eggshells is a great idea... only I never get around to doing it so they just get tossed in as is. It does take a little longer to compost but faster than I seem to take to crush them...
    Haddock said...
    Crushing them before adding to the heap does speed up the composting process :)
    Anthony said...
    Everyone is in such a rush for me make compost. Relax people, my egg shells will decompose even if I don't crush them. :)

    Although, I do see the point of needing compost quickly. And that's why I'm looking into a compost tumbler.
    Jenna said...
    Wow. I feel like I'm WAY behind th erest of the class. i keep finding new things to toss in my composter. Last week it was finding out I can shred newspapers and toss that in, this week - eggshells. I've gardened since I was little, but these things never even occurred to my feathered brain.

    Thanks for the heads up. My garden - and my pantry - thank you.
    wam said...
    Jenna, on the topic of newspaper in a compost bin... I generally try to recycle what I can, which includes newspaper; however, I do compost up my used pizza delivery boxes which they won't recycle here in Cincy.

    I take a razor knife, cut them into 2-3 inch strips, then soak the strips in a gallon or two of rain water over night to loosen up the glue. Once soaked, the pizza box strips are then seperated into the individual sheets, torn and thrown into the bin. They are generally unrecognizable within just a couple days.
    Anthony said...
    Jenna, thanks for visiting. And I hope you're next omlette finds it's way into your garden. :)

    Wam, great idea with the pizza box. Our town recycling won't take pizza boxes either. I may have to copy your idea, thanks!
    Veronica Martinez said...
    Thank you all ! Your ideas are great :) i tnink im going to star saving my eggs shell and my newspaper! !

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