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Growing Hosta

Hostas are the MVPs of shady yards. And you can usually buy a bag of 10 bareroot Hostas for under $10, so they're a bargain too. Of course there's more exotic and expensive Hostas but I've had good luck with the regular bargain bin variety.

I start my bareroot Hostas is pots filled with compost and keep them in a spot where I can watch them. Once they get past that first year they become near indestructable. You can almost just toss them on your driveway and they'll be fine. Well, maybe I'd stick to somewhere with dirt but you get the idea.

11 Comments:

  1. Carol said...
    Hostas are also a great passalong plant. You can dig and divide them pretty much whenever, and they'll do fine.

    I live not too far from a Hosta/Daylily farm and it is fun to go there and see the wide variety of hostas that are available.
    Anthony said...
    Carol, A hosta/dailily farm sounds like a great place to spend the day.

    I'm a big fan of dividing too. I find the best tool I have to divide a hosta is a big cerated bread knife. Much more precise than a shovel. :)
    Kate said...
    I've never grown Hostas bareroot ... but that's a cool idea. I had to laugh thinking about Hostas growing on a driveway ... I'm a big fan of indestructible plants, which most have to be to survive where I live.

    Great blog...
    steven said...
    I've never paid for a hosta in my life. Sooner or later someone calls and asks if I want some.
    Anthony said...
    Kate, I've seen hosta that were chopped up with a lawn mower come back no problem, so the driveway isn't a big stretch.

    Steven, people usually call me to see if I want to subscribe to magazines. I never got on the free hosta calling list. :)
    Opal: Vegan Momma said...
    I love hostas. You're correct they appear indestructible. I haven't bought one yet.

    steven,
    I'm in the same boat. I haven't bought one yet. My mother has given me some of hers.
    Ginger from Mississippi said...
    do hostas die back in the winter? about half of my backyard is shady and grass doesn't grow very well there. I was thinking of planting some hostas around the trees... any other ideas? thanks!
    lornadoone said...
    I was impressed just yesterday when I noticed someone in the neighborhood had about six or seven varieties of hostas growing in separate clumps in one landscaped bed. It looked so great!

    I'm hoping to get on that hosta calling list, too. I did receive a ton of day lilies and some columbine from neighbors when I moved in last year. Perhaps I'll have to wander around and see who is getting rid of what.
    Annie in Austin said...
    You have a very practical attitude toward these plants, Anthony! I can't imagine you spending time turning pages of fifty-dollar hostas in the catalogs.

    In Illinois I sometimes a big plant up to divide, then set chunks around to see how they'd look. Even when they sat there forgotten fo weeks, they'd still grow.

    Down here the hostas are not happy plants, so I dig up clumps of liriope and forget to replant them instead.

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose
    Kati said...
    I had to laugh when you suggested throwing the hostas on the driveway...My mother-in-law, who would agree she has a black thumb, nearly did just that. Taking the advice of a gardener, whose calendulas she admired, she threw the seeds onto an raw, newly excavated hillside behind her drive. She really was puzzled when they seeds did nothing on the bare rock/clay of the exposed subsoil.
    lisa said...
    My hostas are definately the best performers in the garden! While I do get freebies from my mom and sister, my addiction is such that the $50 plants sometimes lure me in...just this year, in fact! As for hardiness, I think Ginger would have no problem if she plants a bunch! I'm zone 4, mine die back every year and return just fine-even the one in a 4" deep metal/enamelware pot!

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